Nuptials of the Regency

And now for some various Regency-era nuptial announcements from La Belle Assemblée or, Bell’s Court and Fashionable Magazine Addressed Particularly to the Ladies .

From the March, 1817 issue of the aforesaid Magazine:

At Ringwood, Mr. T. Bloomfield, aged 70, to Mrs. Mooren, aged 40. So decrepit and helpless was the old man that it was with the greatest difficulty that he could be taken from the chaise which brought him from the church; and when in the church he was obliged to be drawn to the altar in a cart.”

Another singular notification appeared in the September issue of that same year:

At Rothwell Church, Mr. Thomas Craven, of the Leeds Pottery, to Miss Coultare, both of Leeds, after a tedious courtship of twenty-eight years, six months and six days.”

Leeds Pottery manufactured a popular Regency dinnerware known as creamware. Still in business today, their website informs:

“This was a new type of earthenware made from white Cornish clay Leeds creamware potterycombined with a translucent glaze to produce its characteristic pale cream colour…perfect for making the elegant and highly decorative tableware in demand in the Georgian age.”

 

Reverend N. Trefidder, by reason of his profession, had the right and duty to issue the banns of his own impending wedding to Miss Peggy Butterall. The Magazine noted this announcement in its January, 1818 issue, adding:

It is remarkable that a similar instance took place in the same parish about twenty years ago, when the minister married the clerk’s widow.

And finally, an example of the great Society wedding announcement, from May of 1818:

The Honorable Colonel Seymour to Lady Charlotte Cholmondeley, daughter of the Marquis of Cholmondeley; his Lordship on the happy occasion gave a grand entertainment to His Highness, the Prince Regent, and a large party of distinguished personages…The lovely bride’s dress was a white satin slip, covered with rich point lace; headdress feathers and diamonds.

Featured in Ackerman's Repository, June 1 1819, the costume consists of a white satin slip covered with white transparent gauze to fashion a round morning dress, courtesy of Miss Pierpoint, Dressmaker, No. 9 Henrietta Street in Covent Garden.

Featured in Ackerman’s Repository, June 1 1819, this costume consists of a white satin slip covered with white transparent gauze to fashion a round morning dress, courtesy of Miss Pierpoint, Dressmaker, No. 9 Henrietta Street in Covent Garden.

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6 thoughts on “Nuptials of the Regency

  1. “He was obliged to be drawn to the altar in a cart.” 🙂 Too funny. One wonders why he wanted to marry at all. Unless his reasons were similar to those of the cheap old grandfather in one of Georgette Heyer’s novels (can’t remember which one!) who married his housekeeper so he would no longer have to bear the expense of paying her a wage.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Was it Kitty Charing’s old “uncle” Penicuik who married her governess, Miss Fishguard, in Cotillion? Not sure if that’s the one you’re thinking of, but your comment reminds me of these hilarious pairings in Heyer novels.

      Liked by 1 person

      • That was one of them, definitely, but I think there was a short story in Pistols for Two that I was thinking of. Can’t remember which one except that when the dependent ward or granddaughter arrived, the elderly fellow had just married his housekeeper/cook and she was already spending his money on a new bonnet.

        Liked by 1 person

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